1. Volunteer Recap: Why Wearing The Right Shoes In Rio Matters
Public health student Robert Snyder says he’s been back and forth between U.S. and Brazil at least six times. While some trips were for fun, others were to study how diseases affect some of the country’s poorest communities.
Snyder, 28, who’s pursuing a doctorate in epidemiology atUniversity of California, Berkeley, is currently in Rio de Janeiro studying how diseases strike in the city’s slums, or favelas. He’s interviewing families to learn what puts them at risk for diabetes, TB and staph. Last summer, Snyder was there for three months, delving into the rate of high blood pressure in slums and comparing it with the rate in communities with better health care options. And on his very first day, he had an unpleasant encounter.
He may have been in the wrong place at the wrong time. Then again, he might have been a victim of an inappropriate footwear choice:
What happened?
I got mugged the day I got there. It was 8 o’clock on a Sunday night, and I wanted to go over to a friend’s house. I was walking down the street and this kid and his girlfriend walked up to me. They pushed me against the wall, and he put a knife against my chest and said, “If you don’t give me money, I’m going to kill you,” in Portuguese. So I took out my wallet, gave them the money. His girlfriend put her hand in my pocket and took my cellphone, which I hadn’t even activated yet.
I went to the police station right next to my house, and they took me to the other side of the city to a special police station for tourists. I remember the female officer was like, “Oh, next time that happens, just punch him in the face.”
And you blame … your shoes?
[The mugging] happened because I wore the wrong shoes — at least that’s what people told me. In Brazil, everyone has these plastic flip-flops called Havaianas, a famous Brazilian brand. You have to wear them everywhere, and if you’re not wearing them, especially in Rio, people know you are not from there. I had on Birkenstock clogs, which I have since learned no Brazilian would ever wear.
Continue reading.
Photo: Robert Snyder takes a break at Baia de Guanabara, Brazil’s second largest bay. (Courtesy of Robert Snyder) View in High-Res

    Volunteer Recap: Why Wearing The Right Shoes In Rio Matters

    Public health student Robert Snyder says he’s been back and forth between U.S. and Brazil at least six times. While some trips were for fun, others were to study how diseases affect some of the country’s poorest communities.

    Snyder, 28, who’s pursuing a doctorate in epidemiology atUniversity of California, Berkeley, is currently in Rio de Janeiro studying how diseases strike in the city’s slums, or favelas. He’s interviewing families to learn what puts them at risk for diabetes, TB and staph. Last summer, Snyder was there for three months, delving into the rate of high blood pressure in slums and comparing it with the rate in communities with better health care options. And on his very first day, he had an unpleasant encounter.

    He may have been in the wrong place at the wrong time. Then again, he might have been a victim of an inappropriate footwear choice:

    What happened?

    I got mugged the day I got there. It was 8 o’clock on a Sunday night, and I wanted to go over to a friend’s house. I was walking down the street and this kid and his girlfriend walked up to me. They pushed me against the wall, and he put a knife against my chest and said, “If you don’t give me money, I’m going to kill you,” in Portuguese. So I took out my wallet, gave them the money. His girlfriend put her hand in my pocket and took my cellphone, which I hadn’t even activated yet.

    I went to the police station right next to my house, and they took me to the other side of the city to a special police station for tourists. I remember the female officer was like, “Oh, next time that happens, just punch him in the face.”

    And you blame … your shoes?

    [The mugging] happened because I wore the wrong shoes — at least that’s what people told me. In Brazil, everyone has these plastic flip-flops called Havaianas, a famous Brazilian brand. You have to wear them everywhere, and if you’re not wearing them, especially in Rio, people know you are not from there. I had on Birkenstock clogs, which I have since learned no Brazilian would ever wear.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Robert Snyder takes a break at Baia de Guanabara, Brazil’s second largest bay. (Courtesy of Robert Snyder)

  2. Global health

    Brazil

    riodejaneiro

    havaianas

  1. Stories of trafficking — including a sting using a “Walking Dead” actress — are making headlines. Andrea Matolcsi, an expert on trafficking at Equality Now, a global organization that fights for the rights of women and girls, talks to us about the practice, which victimizes millions around the world.
Read more: Will A Sting, A Court Award And A Protest Help Stop Global Sex Trafficking? View in High-Res

    Stories of trafficking — including a sting using a “Walking Dead” actress — are making headlines. Andrea Matolcsi, an expert on trafficking at Equality Now, a global organization that fights for the rights of women and girls, talks to us about the practice, which victimizes millions around the world.

    Read more: Will A Sting, A Court Award And A Protest Help Stop Global Sex Trafficking?

  2. Global health

    human trafficking

    sex workers

  1. 3-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes To Nurse
Isata Kallon, a nurse at Kenema Hospital in eastern Sierra Leone, remembers the day 3-year-old Ibrahim showed up at the Ebola treatment center. He was with his mother and two older brothers, ages 5 and 8. They all had Ebola. Ibrahim was especially sick, vomiting constantly.
"The chance of survival was very low for him," says Kallon, who’s in her 30s. She sits at a picnic table outside the Ebola ward, her hair pulled back with a hairband and her blue nursing scrubs tinged with sweat around the neck.
She spent much of the next week caring for the family, along with dozens of other patients in the makeshift Ebola ward — a large white tent near a sloping hill outside the hospital. Each time she entered the unit, she would find Ibrahim in a different place.
"I [mostly found] him lying on the beds of other patients," she said. She wasn’t sure if he was lonely or confused, but she had trouble keeping him in his own bed. "So every time, I had to take him, give him a bath and dress him up and put him back [on his own mattress]," she said.
Meanwhile, Ibrahim’s mother’s health began to worsen. She began vomiting heavily and had severe diarrhea. Then, roughly seven days after the family had first arrived, she passed away. Ibrahim and his brothers were still alive in their beds, just a few feet away.
Continue reading.
Photo: After beating Ebola, young Ibrahim celebrated by proposing to his nurse. (Anders Kelto/NPR) View in High-Res

    3-Year-Old Ebola Survivor Proposes To Nurse

    Isata Kallon, a nurse at Kenema Hospital in eastern Sierra Leone, remembers the day 3-year-old Ibrahim showed up at the Ebola treatment center. He was with his mother and two older brothers, ages 5 and 8. They all had Ebola. Ibrahim was especially sick, vomiting constantly.

    "The chance of survival was very low for him," says Kallon, who’s in her 30s. She sits at a picnic table outside the Ebola ward, her hair pulled back with a hairband and her blue nursing scrubs tinged with sweat around the neck.

    She spent much of the next week caring for the family, along with dozens of other patients in the makeshift Ebola ward — a large white tent near a sloping hill outside the hospital. Each time she entered the unit, she would find Ibrahim in a different place.

    "I [mostly found] him lying on the beds of other patients," she said. She wasn’t sure if he was lonely or confused, but she had trouble keeping him in his own bed. "So every time, I had to take him, give him a bath and dress him up and put him back [on his own mattress]," she said.

    Meanwhile, Ibrahim’s mother’s health began to worsen. She began vomiting heavily and had severe diarrhea. Then, roughly seven days after the family had first arrived, she passed away. Ibrahim and his brothers were still alive in their beds, just a few feet away.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: After beating Ebola, young Ibrahim celebrated by proposing to his nurse. (Anders Kelto/NPR)

  2. Global health

    Ebola

    Liberia

    survivor

  1. NPR’s Nurith Aizenman visited a former U.S. Army base in Alabama that’s been rigged to look just like an Ebola treatment center in West Africa. The base is where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is running a training program for clinicians headed to Ebola-stricken countries. The course runs three days every week through January with about 35 students per session.
And the curriculum? Lots of detailed instructions on how to put on and take off the personal protective gear medical workers must wear, of course.
Take a peek at the syllabus: Lessons From Ebola School: How To Draw Blood, Wipe Up Vomit View in High-Res

    NPR’s Nurith Aizenman visited a former U.S. Army base in Alabama that’s been rigged to look just like an Ebola treatment center in West Africa. The base is where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is running a training program for clinicians headed to Ebola-stricken countries. The course runs three days every week through January with about 35 students per session.

    And the curriculum? Lots of detailed instructions on how to put on and take off the personal protective gear medical workers must wear, of course.

    Take a peek at the syllabus: Lessons From Ebola School: How To Draw Blood, Wipe Up Vomit

  2. Global Health

    Ebola

    West Africa

    CDC

    medical training

  1. A Balanced Diet For World Food Day: Bugs, Groundnuts And Grains
What’s for dinner on World Food Day?
How about a humble meal of dried termites stirred into a sukuma wiki stew? With a side of sorghum couscous?
World Food Day was invented by the U.N. in 1979 and first celebrated the next year. One goal is to promote underutilized, highly nutritious foods for the 800 million people in lower income countries who can’t easily prepare balanced meals.
We asked Action Against Hunger, a nonprofit group, to cook up a list of foods that could make a big nutritional difference. And yes, the list includes termites.
Termites, Three Ways
Yes, the same bug that could destroy the wood in your home is a highly nutritious food: 35 percent protein and a good source of calcium, iron and zinc. Termites can be dried like beef jerky and then later added into any meal for a protein boost. These bugs are typically harvested from the mounds they construct and live in, says Muriel Calo, a researcher at Action Against Hunger.
If you don’t want to take time to dry them, just toss them in a frying pan. They’re really easy to cook: termites fry in their own fat.Daniella Martin, author of Edible: An Adventure into the World of Eating Insects and the Last Great Hope to Save the Planet, also recommends tossing them with olive oil, crushed garlic and salt before baking them at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes.
Dip Into Green Gram
Green gram, also known as mung bean, is a high-protein legume that is native to India and is now grown across East Africa and Southeast Asia. The beans can be boiled in water until they are soft and then either pureed into a hummus-like dip or eaten as is. They can grow almost anywhere there’s a bit of soil.
Continue reading.
Photo: An Indian groundnut vendor waits for customers. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images) View in High-Res

    A Balanced Diet For World Food Day: Bugs, Groundnuts And Grains

    What’s for dinner on World Food Day?

    How about a humble meal of dried termites stirred into a sukuma wiki stew? With a side of sorghum couscous?

    World Food Day was invented by the U.N. in 1979 and first celebrated the next year. One goal is to promote underutilized, highly nutritious foods for the 800 million people in lower income countries who can’t easily prepare balanced meals.

    We asked Action Against Hunger, a nonprofit group, to cook up a list of foods that could make a big nutritional difference. And yes, the list includes termites.

    Termites, Three Ways

    Yes, the same bug that could destroy the wood in your home is a highly nutritious food: 35 percent protein and a good source of calcium, iron and zinc. Termites can be dried like beef jerky and then later added into any meal for a protein boost. These bugs are typically harvested from the mounds they construct and live in, says Muriel Calo, a researcher at Action Against Hunger.

    If you don’t want to take time to dry them, just toss them in a frying pan. They’re really easy to cook: termites fry in their own fat.Daniella Martin, author of Edible: An Adventure into the World of Eating Insects and the Last Great Hope to Save the Planet, also recommends tossing them with olive oil, crushed garlic and salt before baking them at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes.

    Dip Into Green Gram

    Green gram, also known as mung bean, is a high-protein legume that is native to India and is now grown across East Africa and Southeast Asia. The beans can be boiled in water until they are soft and then either pureed into a hummus-like dip or eaten as is. They can grow almost anywhere there’s a bit of soil.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: An Indian groundnut vendor waits for customers. (Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP/Getty Images)

  2. World Food Day

    world hunger

    food security

  1. China’s Nomads Have A Foot In Two Very Different Worlds
Zhaxi Cairang is trying to give his son a choice of two worlds to live in: the traditional, pastoral world of Tibetan nomads, which he has inhabited for most of his 59 years, or the modern urban lifestyle that most Tibetans experience in today’s China.
Zhaxi made the transition himself about 15 years ago, when he left the grasslands and moved into the city of Yushu in western China’s Qinghai province. Yushu sits on the eastern end of the Tibetan plateau. More than 95 percent of its residents are ethnic Tibetans.
I last visited Yushu in 2010, when a devastating earthquake killed around 3,000 people. Since then, the place has made a striking comeback. It’s awash with government investment, new construction and new residents.
Zhaxi’s apartment is clean and modern, with wood floors, a large television and a bottle of Jack Daniel’s on a bookshelf.
The High Cost Of City Living
But Zhaxi says he plans to leave the apartment next year and go back to herding yaks. He says city life is OK, but he just doesn’t have the skills he needs to afford it.
"The housing and subsidies the government gives us are great," he concedes. "We’ve got bathrooms, heat and running water. But they all cost a lot. On the grasslands, we burn yak dung for fuel, and we drink milk, all for free. It’s not as comfortable, but there’s less economic pressure on us."
Zhaxi took out a loan to pay for his current apartment. He plans to produce and sell his own yak meat, yak butter and yak yogurt until the loan is paid off.
Continue reading.
Photo: Zhaxi Cairang (right), a 59-year-old Tibetan nomad, moved to a city in western China 15 years ago as part of a government effort to settle nomads. But Zhaxi says he plans to return to herding yaks next year. His son Cicheng Randing was raised in the city, but his father wants to expose him to traditional nomadic life as well. View in High-Res

    China’s Nomads Have A Foot In Two Very Different Worlds

    Zhaxi Cairang is trying to give his son a choice of two worlds to live in: the traditional, pastoral world of Tibetan nomads, which he has inhabited for most of his 59 years, or the modern urban lifestyle that most Tibetans experience in today’s China.

    Zhaxi made the transition himself about 15 years ago, when he left the grasslands and moved into the city of Yushu in western China’s Qinghai province. Yushu sits on the eastern end of the Tibetan plateau. More than 95 percent of its residents are ethnic Tibetans.

    I last visited Yushu in 2010, when a devastating earthquake killed around 3,000 people. Since then, the place has made a striking comeback. It’s awash with government investment, new construction and new residents.

    Zhaxi’s apartment is clean and modern, with wood floors, a large television and a bottle of Jack Daniel’s on a bookshelf.

    The High Cost Of City Living

    But Zhaxi says he plans to leave the apartment next year and go back to herding yaks. He says city life is OK, but he just doesn’t have the skills he needs to afford it.

    "The housing and subsidies the government gives us are great," he concedes. "We’ve got bathrooms, heat and running water. But they all cost a lot. On the grasslands, we burn yak dung for fuel, and we drink milk, all for free. It’s not as comfortable, but there’s less economic pressure on us."

    Zhaxi took out a loan to pay for his current apartment. He plans to produce and sell his own yak meat, yak butter and yak yogurt until the loan is paid off.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Zhaxi Cairang (right), a 59-year-old Tibetan nomad, moved to a city in western China 15 years ago as part of a government effort to settle nomads. But Zhaxi says he plans to return to herding yaks next year. His son Cicheng Randing was raised in the city, but his father wants to expose him to traditional nomadic life as well.

  2. China

    Tibet

    culture

    nomads

  1. Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?
Jack Scoville was buying himself a chocolate bar a few weeks ago — Hershey’s, milk — at a corner store in Chicago. And he noticed the price was just a bit higher than he’s used to paying: 5 or 10 cents more. His first thought was not to blame a greedy store owner or the executives in Hershey, Pa.
He blamed Ebola.
Scoville is a senior market analyst at Price Futures Group, and he looks at the cocoa commodities market. Last month, cocoa contracts — the price that chocolate suppliers agree to pay for raw cocoa — spiked in large part because of Ebola fears.
"The price made the move to three-year highs in response to the Ebola crisis, on fears that it could spread into Ivory Coast and Ghana," says Scoville.
Ivory Coast and Ghana together produce more than half the world’s cocoa. And they’re both next door to Ebola-affected Liberia and Guinea.
Now the fear isn’t that you can get Ebola from chocolate. Everyone I’ve interviewed on this story urged me to remind my readers that YOU CANNOT GET EBOLA FROM CHOCOLATE. The fear, rather, was that if Ebola were to jump over the border to Ivory Coast, those cocoa farmers would scatter to avoid exposure to the virus. The cocoa fruits — the seeds of that fruit that we call the cocoa bean — would stay unpicked. And Halloween would become as expensive as Christmas.
"That," says Scoville, "would be the fear."
Continue reading.
Photo: A woman farmer picks cocoa pods in a field north of Abidjan, Ivory Coast. (Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images) View in High-Res

    Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

    Jack Scoville was buying himself a chocolate bar a few weeks ago — Hershey’s, milk — at a corner store in Chicago. And he noticed the price was just a bit higher than he’s used to paying: 5 or 10 cents more. His first thought was not to blame a greedy store owner or the executives in Hershey, Pa.

    He blamed Ebola.

    Scoville is a senior market analyst at Price Futures Group, and he looks at the cocoa commodities market. Last month, cocoa contracts — the price that chocolate suppliers agree to pay for raw cocoa — spiked in large part because of Ebola fears.

    "The price made the move to three-year highs in response to the Ebola crisis, on fears that it could spread into Ivory Coast and Ghana," says Scoville.

    Ivory Coast and Ghana together produce more than half the world’s cocoa. And they’re both next door to Ebola-affected Liberia and Guinea.

    Now the fear isn’t that you can get Ebola from chocolate. Everyone I’ve interviewed on this story urged me to remind my readers that YOU CANNOT GET EBOLA FROM CHOCOLATE. The fear, rather, was that if Ebola were to jump over the border to Ivory Coast, those cocoa farmers would scatter to avoid exposure to the virus. The cocoa fruits — the seeds of that fruit that we call the cocoa bean — would stay unpicked. And Halloween would become as expensive as Christmas.

    "That," says Scoville, "would be the fear."

    Continue reading.

    Photo: A woman farmer picks cocoa pods in a field north of Abidjan, Ivory Coast. (Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images)

  2. Ebola

    Chocolate

    Ghana

    Ivory Coast

    cocoa

  1. Gangs Can’t Stop Colombia’s Butterflies From Rescuing Women In Need
They call themselves “the Butterflies.”
And that’s not just wishful thinking.
When Gloria Amparo, Maritza Asprilla Cruz and Mery Medina sweep into NPR’s bureau in central London, they are indeed as beautiful as butterflies: bright clothing, big beaming smiles. They look around in wonder at the newsroom spread out before them, laughing and joking as I make them a cup of tea.
Yet these are women who’ve led tough lives — born into Colombian society, where violence and abuse are commonplace.
In 2010, they started a group they call "Red Mariposas de Alas Nuevas Construyendo Futuro" — “Butterflies with New Wings Building a Future.” Their goal is to support women who are victims of abuse, educating them about their rights and helping them report sexual crimes to the police.
Now they have been recognized for their activism. In Geneva last week, the Nansen Refugee Award — honoring humanitarian efforts for refugees and displaced people — was presented to the Butterflies. “These women are doing extraordinary work in the most challenging of contexts,” said U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres. ”Their bravery goes beyond words.”
The Butterflies are based in Buenaventura, the country’s main Pacific port, home to about 340,000 people. Although the port is an important part of Colombian industry, 80 percent of its population lives below the poverty line. Of those, 20 percent live in extreme poverty. Social services are either scarce or nonexistent. Violence is part of the daily scene. Illegal armed groups battle against each other.
Continue reading.
Photo: Three Butterflies flew to Geneva to accept a humanitarian award: Maritza Asprilla Cruz (from left), Gloria Amparo, Mery Medina. (Juan Arredondo/Courtesy of UNHCR) View in High-Res

    Gangs Can’t Stop Colombia’s Butterflies From Rescuing Women In Need

    They call themselves “the Butterflies.”

    And that’s not just wishful thinking.

    When Gloria Amparo, Maritza Asprilla Cruz and Mery Medina sweep into NPR’s bureau in central London, they are indeed as beautiful as butterflies: bright clothing, big beaming smiles. They look around in wonder at the newsroom spread out before them, laughing and joking as I make them a cup of tea.

    Yet these are women who’ve led tough lives — born into Colombian society, where violence and abuse are commonplace.

    In 2010, they started a group they call "Red Mariposas de Alas Nuevas Construyendo Futuro" — “Butterflies with New Wings Building a Future.” Their goal is to support women who are victims of abuse, educating them about their rights and helping them report sexual crimes to the police.

    Now they have been recognized for their activism. In Geneva last week, the Nansen Refugee Award — honoring humanitarian efforts for refugees and displaced people — was presented to the Butterflies. “These women are doing extraordinary work in the most challenging of contexts,” said U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres. ”Their bravery goes beyond words.”

    The Butterflies are based in Buenaventura, the country’s main Pacific port, home to about 340,000 people. Although the port is an important part of Colombian industry, 80 percent of its population lives below the poverty line. Of those, 20 percent live in extreme poverty. Social services are either scarce or nonexistent. Violence is part of the daily scene. Illegal armed groups battle against each other.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Three Butterflies flew to Geneva to accept a humanitarian award: Maritza Asprilla Cruz (from left), Gloria Amparo, Mery Medina. (Juan Arredondo/Courtesy of UNHCR)

  2. Global health

    Colombia

    women's health

    violence against women

    gang

  1. LED Lights Are A ‘Transformative Technology’ In The Developing World
When the news broke Tuesday that three scientists whose discoveries made practical household LED lighting possible had won the Nobel Prize in physics, most Americans probably thought of the LED screen in their TV, or perhaps about whether they might finally consider shifting to energy-efficient LED lighting in their homes. (The LED, or light-emitting diode, makes use of treated or coated semiconductors to produce light. Blue LED lighting — the Nobelists’ invention — was the missing ingredient that allowed the creation of LED lamps.)
Less familiar is the illumination revolution LED bulbs have helped set off in the developing world. For a growing proportion of the more than a billion people who live without reliable sources of electricity, LED lights, in tandem with solar panels, have been a godsend.
Nearly 5 percent of Africans without access to electricity, or some 28.5 million people, now use solar-powered LED lights. That’s up from 1 percent five years ago, according to figures released this month by Lighting Africa, a project of the International Finance Corp., the private-sector investment arm of the World Bank. There’s a growing market in South Asia, too.
Worldwide, in the past six months, 2.1 million LED-solar products have been sold to people who are unable to plug in to electrical grids, the IFC says. Sales have been growing at a rate of 150 percent annually for several years — a function of both the demand for lighting and the improved quality of LED lamps.
In the wake of the Nobel nod to LEDs, Goats and Soda talked with Russell Sturm, head of energy access at the International Finance Corp.
Read our interview.
Photo: A woman in Senegal charges her cellphone using a port in her solar-powered LED lantern. (Bruno Déméocq/Courtesy of Lighting Africa) View in High-Res

    LED Lights Are A ‘Transformative Technology’ In The Developing World

    When the news broke Tuesday that three scientists whose discoveries made practical household LED lighting possible had won the Nobel Prize in physics, most Americans probably thought of the LED screen in their TV, or perhaps about whether they might finally consider shifting to energy-efficient LED lighting in their homes. (The LED, or light-emitting diode, makes use of treated or coated semiconductors to produce light. Blue LED lighting — the Nobelists’ invention — was the missing ingredient that allowed the creation of LED lamps.)

    Less familiar is the illumination revolution LED bulbs have helped set off in the developing world. For a growing proportion of the more than a billion people who live without reliable sources of electricity, LED lights, in tandem with solar panels, have been a godsend.

    Nearly 5 percent of Africans without access to electricity, or some 28.5 million people, now use solar-powered LED lights. That’s up from 1 percent five years ago, according to figures released this month by Lighting Africa, a project of the International Finance Corp., the private-sector investment arm of the World Bank. There’s a growing market in South Asia, too.

    Worldwide, in the past six months, 2.1 million LED-solar products have been sold to people who are unable to plug in to electrical grids, the IFC says. Sales have been growing at a rate of 150 percent annually for several years — a function of both the demand for lighting and the improved quality of LED lamps.

    In the wake of the Nobel nod to LEDs, Goats and Soda talked with Russell Sturm, head of energy access at the International Finance Corp.

    Read our interview.

    Photo: A woman in Senegal charges her cellphone using a port in her solar-powered LED lantern. (Bruno Déméocq/Courtesy of Lighting Africa)

  2. Global health

    LED

    electricity

    light

  1. On Front Lines Against Ebola, Training A Matter Of Life Or Death
One of the biggest roadblocks in West Africa to containing the Ebola outbreak is the lack of isolation wards for people who are infected.
President Obama has announced plans to build 17 new Ebola Treatment Units in Liberia. Those new medical facilities will require thousands of additional workers who are trained and willing to work in them.
In Monrovia, efforts are also underway to start training local doctors, nurses and janitors on how to safely take care of patients who are sick with the deadly disease. The World Health Organization has taken over a two-story concrete hotel there and transformed the ground floor into a mock Ebola treatment unit.
On a recent day, trainees dressed in white Tyvek suits, gloves, goggles and face masks were trying to restrain an Ebola patient thrashing around on the ward. In the process, several of them get splattered with blood. The blood is fake, but the process feels incredibly real; one of the trainees even runs out of the room.
The exercise is part of a one-week course to try to get new workers ready to handle the challenges of an Ebola ward. Dr. Srinivas Murthy, an infectious disease specialist from the University of British Columbia, is one of the WHO staff guiding the trainees.
Continue reading. 
Photo: Trainees suit up for their final day of training in Monrovia, Liberia. Sixty people were trained the first week. (John W. Poole/NPR) View in High-Res

    On Front Lines Against Ebola, Training A Matter Of Life Or Death

    One of the biggest roadblocks in West Africa to containing the Ebola outbreak is the lack of isolation wards for people who are infected.

    President Obama has announced plans to build 17 new Ebola Treatment Units in Liberia. Those new medical facilities will require thousands of additional workers who are trained and willing to work in them.

    In Monrovia, efforts are also underway to start training local doctors, nurses and janitors on how to safely take care of patients who are sick with the deadly disease. The World Health Organization has taken over a two-story concrete hotel there and transformed the ground floor into a mock Ebola treatment unit.

    On a recent day, trainees dressed in white Tyvek suits, gloves, goggles and face masks were trying to restrain an Ebola patient thrashing around on the ward. In the process, several of them get splattered with blood. The blood is fake, but the process feels incredibly real; one of the trainees even runs out of the room.

    The exercise is part of a one-week course to try to get new workers ready to handle the challenges of an Ebola ward. Dr. Srinivas Murthy, an infectious disease specialist from the University of British Columbia, is one of the WHO staff guiding the trainees.

    Continue reading. 

    Photo: Trainees suit up for their final day of training in Monrovia, Liberia. Sixty people were trained the first week. (John W. Poole/NPR)

  2. Global Health

    Ebola

    Liberia

    Monrovia

    heatlh workers