1. Pot Smoke And Mirrors: Vaporizer Pens Hide Marijuana Use

    It’s a sunny afternoon at Kelly’s Collective, a medical marijuana dispensary in Los Angeles, and Nikki Esquibel is getting stoned. But you wouldn’t know it.

    The 19-year-old, who has a medical prescription for marijuana, is “smoking” pot with a handheld vaporizer, or a vape pen. It’s sleek, black, and virtually indistinguishable from a high-end e-cigarette.

    That’s the point, says Esquibel. “I use it mostly around my neighborhood. It’s easy to hide.” The vapor coming from the device doesn’t even have an odor.

    Discretion, it turns out, makes for good money. While e-cigaretteshave been grabbing the headlines, the vape pen industry has been quietly ballooning. And it’s reshaping the business and culture of marijuana.

    Most vape pens don’t actually vaporize the marijuana plant. They’re loaded with marijuana concentrates or “hash oil:” a viscous, yellow resin chemically extracted from the plant. In many places, that extraction often occurs in somebody’s kitchen — which can be explosive and dangerous.

    And the concentrates can be strong. Really, really strong. Marijuana leaves usually contain about 25 percent THC, the psychoactive chemical that makes you feel high. But the concentrates can contain up to 90 percent THC. Esquibel says she almost fainted when she tried her first hit.

    Those high THC levels worry Allen St. Pierre, executive director of the National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws, a nonprofit lobbying group working to broadly legalize marijuana use.

    "Between the fact that you can potentially pass out with a single inhalation, or you can have such property damage and potential bodily harm just producing it … these [issues of the vape pen] definitely need to be addressed," he says. "This is a screaming call for regulation if there ever was one."

    And what about the health effects of vaping pot compared to smoking it?

    "The problem is that, right now, it’s hard to tell how much [THC] you are actually getting when you take a puff of one of these things," says Mark Kleiman, who studies marijuana laws and policies at the University of California, Los Angeles. “The risk of getting wrecked is a lot higher.”

    And given that the output of vape pens is odorless, Kleiman is also concerned about what the rising popularity of the devices means for parents and teachers.

    "For them this will be a nightmare," he tells Shots. "If I am running a school or a house and I have a nose, I can tell if my kids are smoking pot. But if they’re using a vape pen, forget about it."

    Learn more

    Top Photo: Vaporizer pens use marijuana concentrates or “hash oil” — a viscous, yellow resin chemically extracted from the plant.(Andres Rodriguez/Flickr.com)

    Bottom Photo: Nikki Esquibel, 19, has a medical prescription for marijuana. She uses a vaporizer pen around her neighborhood in Los Angeles. (Miles Bryan/NPR)

  2. health

    marijauna

    medicine

    pot

  1. You’ve got the poorest part of the world paying the highest charges for what is a relatively simple money transfer operation…
    This isn’t about aid, its not about reinforcing their dependence on rich countries, it’s about giving them their own chance to work their way out of poverty.

    — 

    Kevin Watkins, director of the Overseas Development Agency in London, talking about a new report on how African migrants pay some of the highest international money transfer rates in the world.

  2. migrants

    Remittance

    africa

  1. Twenty years ago, only 1 to 2 % of women with cancer in one breast made that choice (double mastectomy). Now the rates are 15, 20, 25 percent.

    — 

    Dr. Todd Tuttle, chief of surgical oncology at the the University of Minnesota speaking to NPR’s Marc Silver

  2. breast cancer

    mastectomy

  1. Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral
If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let’s hope you came home with nothing but great memories.
A young woman at that concert in Seattle has come down with measles, which can be spread for days by a person who’s infected but not yet sick. That’s bad news for the thousands of people who shared the concert hall with her, or were at the many other places she went that week.
And that’s why the Washington State Department of Health has published the unidentified woman’s schedule online.
"The reason we’re doing this is that it’s so highly contagious," says Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, who is chief of communicable disease control for Seattle and King County Public Health, which investigated the measles case. “It can stay in the air for hours after the contagious person has left. If we don’t treat these people, the chain of transmission can continue.”
The young woman became contagious on March 26, after visiting a family with measles cases that were linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. Unaware she was infected, she went to work at a bakery, filled her car up at a gas station, went to the concert, went to Pike Place Market and went out for sushi. All the while she was spreading viruses in the air.
So if you were at the Starbucks at 102 Pike Street between 11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m. on March 29 and you’re not sure if you’re immune to measles, the Washington State Department of Health wants you to see a health care professional immediately. You may be in the market for a quick shot of vaccine or immune globulin.
Continue reading.
Photo: This one’s virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com) View in High-Res

    Measles At A Rock Concert Goes Viral

    If you went to see the Kings of Leon concert on March 28 in Seattle, let’s hope you came home with nothing but great memories.

    A young woman at that concert in Seattle has come down with measles, which can be spread for days by a person who’s infected but not yet sick. That’s bad news for the thousands of people who shared the concert hall with her, or were at the many other places she went that week.

    And that’s why the Washington State Department of Health has published the unidentified woman’s schedule online.

    "The reason we’re doing this is that it’s so highly contagious," says Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, who is chief of communicable disease control for Seattle and King County Public Health, which investigated the measles case. “It can stay in the air for hours after the contagious person has left. If we don’t treat these people, the chain of transmission can continue.”

    The young woman became contagious on March 26, after visiting a family with measles cases that were linked to an outbreak in British Columbia. Unaware she was infected, she went to work at a bakery, filled her car up at a gas station, went to the concert, went to Pike Place Market and went out for sushi. All the while she was spreading viruses in the air.

    So if you were at the Starbucks at 102 Pike Street between 11:15 a.m. and 2 p.m. on March 29 and you’re not sure if you’re immune to measles, the Washington State Department of Health wants you to see a health care professional immediately. You may be in the market for a quick shot of vaccine or immune globulin.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: This one’s virus-free: Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill and Caleb Followill of Kings of Leon performed in Los Angeles in December. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Radio.com)

  2. global health

    medicine

    health

    epidemiology

    vaccines

    measles

  1. okkultmotionpictures:

    EXCERPTS >|< Life History of a Mosquito (1928)


     | Hosted at: Internet Archive
     | From: Wellcome Library
     | Download: Ogg | 512Kb MPEG4 | MPEG4
     | Digital Copy: attribution-non commercial 3.0 US


    A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Life History of a Mosquito, a video showing life cycle of Aedes Aegypti: microphotography of eggs; larva, pupa and then adult mosquito emerging; female and male breeding. Made in 1928 by Kodak Research Laboratories, in co-operation with the Dept. of Bacteriology of the Medical School, University of Rochester.

    We invite you to watch the full video HERE




    Excerpts by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from out-of-copyright/unknown/rare/controversial moving images.
    A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

    >|<

    Makes you realize how important it is to remove all standing water when it comes to controlling mosquitoes. 

  2. global health

    science

    malaria

    mosquitoes

  1. Why Is Guinea’s Ebola Outbreak So Unusual?

    Doctors Without Borders has called the current outbreak of the Ebola virus in Guinea “unprecedented” — not because of the number of victims (so far at least 78 have died) but because the disease has traveled to various parts of the country. The widespread infection (which includes the capital city of Conakry) is at least unusual, the World Health Organization agrees, and presents more challenges than usual to the medical team seeking to contain the virus.

    To learn more, we spoke with Esther Sterk, a tropical medicine adviser for Doctors Without Borders. She’s been on the ground during past Ebola outbreaks in Africa.

    How concerned are you about this outbreak?

    We know from other outbreaks that epidemics can be stopped. And the principle is always the same: isolating suspected patients to prevent [them from giving] the disease to people around them. Also you follow the people who have been in close contact with patients with Ebola. So in the incubation period (which is 21 days), we follow them [tracking their contacts, and distributing information about prevention], because Ebola is [transmitted] by close contact with infected people. It’s [spread via] body fluids, like the blood and the urine and the saliva, the stools — all body fluids are contagious.

    Do you think there will be many more cases?

    Ebola is not airborne, so not contagious like, for example, the flu. Now we know more or less which families are infected, so we are following them. The expectation is that if the people in the community are better informed about the disease, we can detect all possible cases of Ebola and [quarantine] them.

    How long do you think it will take to contain this Ebola outbreak?

    We will manage to contain this outbreak in a short amount of time, but it’s difficult to say at the moment.

    Photos: Top: The World Health Organization delivers disposable personal protection equipment to isolation ward at the China-Guinea Friendship Hospital in Conakry, Guinea. (WHO/T. Jasarevic)

    Bottom: The recent Ebola outbreak started in southern Guinea, but has spread. Authorities have recorded 122 suspected cases so far and 78 deaths. (WHO)

  2. global health

    ebola

    medicine

    emergency medicine

    West africa

  1. The Ebola hemorrhagic disease is terrifying, as the virus punches microscopic holes in the endothelial lining of blood veins, vessels, and capillaries, causing blood to leak from its normal pipelines coursing through the body. Within hours, the punctures enlarge … and blood pours into the intestines, bowels, and respiratory channels. As the victims become feverish — raging in pain and hallucinations — their tears drip red with blood.

    — Laura Garrett in her article “Don’t Kiss The Cadaver,” about the Ebola outbreak in Guinea

  2. global health

    ebola

    medicine

    infectious diseases

    cfr

  1. Where Everyone In The World Is Migrating, In One Gorgeous Chart
In a study published Thursday in Science, geographers analyzed global migration patterns around the world over the past 20 years. 
The result is this beautiful infographic and interactive app. 
Qz notes two interesting findings from the study:

1) Adjusted for population growth, the global migration rate has stayed roughly the same since around  since 1995 (it was higher from 1990-1995).
2) It’s not the poorest countries sending people to the richest countries, it’s countries in transition—still poor, but with some education and mobility—that are the highest migratory contributors.

Where are the highest rates of migration&#160;? Qz explains:

1) The largest regional migration is from Southeast Asia to the Middle East. This is largely driven by the huge, oil-driven, construction booms happening on the Arabian Peninsula.
2) The biggest flow between individual countries is the steady stream from Mexico to the US. (In fact, the US is the largest single migrant destination)
3) There’s a huge circulation of migrants among sub-Saharan African countries. This migration dwarfs the number leaving Africa, but the media pay more attention the latter because of the austerity-driven immigration debates in Europe.



Learn more.
The graphic here shows 75 percent of migration flows from 2005 to 2010.(Circos/ Krzywinski, M. et al.)
View in High-Res

    Where Everyone In The World Is Migrating, In One Gorgeous Chart

    In a study published Thursday in Science, geographers analyzed global migration patterns around the world over the past 20 years. 

    The result is this beautiful infographic and interactive app

    Qz notes two interesting findings from the study:

    1) Adjusted for population growth, the global migration rate has stayed roughly the same since around  since 1995 (it was higher from 1990-1995).

    2) It’s not the poorest countries sending people to the richest countries, it’s countries in transition—still poor, but with some education and mobility—that are the highest migratory contributors.

    Where are the highest rates of migration ? Qz explains:

    1) The largest regional migration is from Southeast Asia to the Middle East. This is largely driven by the huge, oil-driven, construction booms happening on the Arabian Peninsula.

    2) The biggest flow between individual countries is the steady stream from Mexico to the US(In fact, the US is the largest single migrant destination)

    3) There’s a huge circulation of migrants among sub-Saharan African countries. This migration dwarfs the number leaving Africa, but the media pay more attention the latter because of the austerity-driven immigration debates in Europe.

    The graphic here shows 75 percent of migration flows from 2005 to 2010.(Circos/ Krzywinski, M. et al.)

  2. science

    global health

    data visualization

    immigration

  1. How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene
Sometimes now it&#8217;s tough for women in science to be heard and believed. Thirty years ago, it was even worse. 
But that didn&#8217;t stop geneticist Mary-Claire King from making one of the most important discoveries in breast cancer research.
Back in the 1970s, King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.
It took 17 years for King and her colleague to identify the single gene that could cause both breast and ovarian cancer. During that time, many people discounted her work, saying that genes couldn&#8217;t cause complex diseases like cancer. She proved them wrong, first by mapping the gene&#8217;s location, and then in 1994, by announcing that her laboratory had successfully cloned the BRCA1 gene. (King describes her experience in Thursday&#8217;s issue of the journalScience.)
The discovery revolutionized genetics and cancer treatment. Simple genetic tests now let women know if they have mutations in their BRCA genes that increase cancer risk. They then can act on that knowledge, as actress Angelina Jolie did.
King, now a professor of genome science at the University of Washington, talked with NPR&#8217;s Audie Cornish on Thursday about how she slowly but surely built evidence to prove that BRCA did indeed cause cancer.
Continue reading.
Photo: Geneticist Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes. (Mary Levin/University of Washington) View in High-Res

    How Being Ignored Helped A Woman Discover The Breast Cancer Gene

    Sometimes now it’s tough for women in science to be heard and believed. Thirty years ago, it was even worse

    But that didn’t stop geneticist Mary-Claire King from making one of the most important discoveries in breast cancer research.

    Back in the 1970s, King decided she needed to figure out why women in some families were much more likely to get breast cancer.

    It took 17 years for King and her colleague to identify the single gene that could cause both breast and ovarian cancer. During that time, many people discounted her work, saying that genes couldn’t cause complex diseases like cancer. She proved them wrong, first by mapping the gene’s location, and then in 1994, by announcing that her laboratory had successfully cloned the BRCA1 gene. (King describes her experience in Thursday’s issue of the journalScience.)

    The discovery revolutionized genetics and cancer treatment. Simple genetic tests now let women know if they have mutations in their BRCA genes that increase cancer risk. They then can act on that knowledge, as actress Angelina Jolie did.

    King, now a professor of genome science at the University of Washington, talked with NPR’s Audie Cornish on Thursday about how she slowly but surely built evidence to prove that BRCA did indeed cause cancer.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Geneticist Mary-Claire King says obscurity gave her the freedom to spend years looking for breast cancer genes. (Mary Levin/University of Washington)

  2. science

    genetics

    Cancer

    health

    medicine

    history

  1. Posted on 27 March, 2014

    845 notes | Permalink

    Reblogged from unicef

    Watch the world back polio into a corner &#8230; Just three countries left until global eradication of the virus!
BTW: The World Health Organization said that its Southeast Asian region is now officially polio-free.
The milestone means that 80 percent of the world&#8217;s population now lives without fear of the paralyzing disease.
unicef:

From 1988 to 2014, watch the battle to eradicate polio unfold.
Red means the country still has cases of wild polio, yellow means the country is in a region that still has cases of wild polio, and white means that the disease has been eradicated. 
Thanks to CNN for this great GIF! Check out the whole story here: http://cnn.it/1h0Mu3K 
View in High-Res

    Watch the world back polio into a corner … Just three countries left until global eradication of the virus!

    BTW: The World Health Organization said that its Southeast Asian region is now officially polio-free.

    The milestone means that 80 percent of the world’s population now lives without fear of the paralyzing disease.

    unicef:

    From 1988 to 2014, watch the battle to eradicate polio unfold.

    Red means the country still has cases of wild polio, yellow means the country is in a region that still has cases of wild polio, and white means that the disease has been eradicated. 

    Thanks to CNN for this great GIF! Check out the whole story here: http://cnn.it/1h0Mu3K 

  2. global health

    medicine

    polio

    infectious diseases

    vaccines