1. Barbara Bush may be known as the quieter of the Bush twins, but when it comes to global health, she’s anything but. At 32, the Yale graduate is co-founder and CEO of Global Health Corps, a nonprofit organization that pairs young volunteers with health and development organizations.
We caught up with Bush earlier this summer at the U.N., where she spoke about the role of entrepreneurs at this year’s Global Accelerator conference, which discussed innovations needed to tackle issues like reproductive health, job creation and water and sanitation.
She hadn’t set out to work in this field, she told us.
Read our interview here: A Trip With Her Folks Turned Barbara Bush Into A Global Activist View in High-Res

    Barbara Bush may be known as the quieter of the Bush twins, but when it comes to global health, she’s anything but. At 32, the Yale graduate is co-founder and CEO of Global Health Corps, a nonprofit organization that pairs young volunteers with health and development organizations.

    We caught up with Bush earlier this summer at the U.N., where she spoke about the role of entrepreneurs at this year’s Global Accelerator conference, which discussed innovations needed to tackle issues like reproductive health, job creation and water and sanitation.

    She hadn’t set out to work in this field, she told us.

    Read our interview here: A Trip With Her Folks Turned Barbara Bush Into A Global Activist

  2. Global Health

    Barbara Bush

    Bush twins

    volunteers

  1. Volunteer Docs In Peru Take A Shopping Trip To Look For Patients
After a couple days operating on people in Iquitos, Peru, we realize we’re going to need some more patients.
We started with about 50 candidates, with hernias, tumors or unidentified pains. But most were excluded for a variety of reasons. Some were too old or weak, and we feared complications with their hearts. Some never returned with the x-rays (relatively affordable at government clinics) we would need before operating. Yet others had conditions we were not equipped to operate on, like tumors of the ovaries or uterus.
A couple of us medical students headed out into the neighborhoods to find more patients.
Iquitos is divided into four districts, each with its own mayor and demographics. Belen is the poorest, situated on the edge of town. It literally extends into the Itaya River, a huge tributary of the Amazon. The houses are built on stilts or just float, tied to posts to prevent them from drifting away. The farther out on the river, the more questionable the construction gets: homes cobbled together with scrap wood and plastic. If you are truly poor, this is where you stake your claim.
We begin in the market, the largest in the city, and walk gradually downhill past stalls offering chicken, fish and monkey meat. There are clothes and shoes as well, but it’s the meat that catches your eye, laid out on wooden tables and of questionable freshness.
Tarps strung over the street between the stalls lend red, green or blue hues to the scene. Through the open areas between these tarps, vultures descend to the street to squabble with stray dogs over scraps.
Continue reading.
Photo: During the rainy season, a canoe is a handy vehicle to have in the waterlogged Peruvian neighborhood of Belen. (Courtesy of Dave Ohlson) View in High-Res

    Volunteer Docs In Peru Take A Shopping Trip To Look For Patients

    After a couple days operating on people in Iquitos, Peru, we realize we’re going to need some more patients.

    We started with about 50 candidates, with hernias, tumors or unidentified pains. But most were excluded for a variety of reasons. Some were too old or weak, and we feared complications with their hearts. Some never returned with the x-rays (relatively affordable at government clinics) we would need before operating. Yet others had conditions we were not equipped to operate on, like tumors of the ovaries or uterus.

    A couple of us medical students headed out into the neighborhoods to find more patients.

    Iquitos is divided into four districts, each with its own mayor and demographics. Belen is the poorest, situated on the edge of town. It literally extends into the Itaya River, a huge tributary of the Amazon. The houses are built on stilts or just float, tied to posts to prevent them from drifting away. The farther out on the river, the more questionable the construction gets: homes cobbled together with scrap wood and plastic. If you are truly poor, this is where you stake your claim.

    We begin in the market, the largest in the city, and walk gradually downhill past stalls offering chicken, fish and monkey meat. There are clothes and shoes as well, but it’s the meat that catches your eye, laid out on wooden tables and of questionable freshness.

    Tarps strung over the street between the stalls lend red, green or blue hues to the scene. Through the open areas between these tarps, vultures descend to the street to squabble with stray dogs over scraps.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: During the rainy season, a canoe is a handy vehicle to have in the waterlogged Peruvian neighborhood of Belen. (Courtesy of Dave Ohlson)

  2. Global health

    medical school

    medical student

    iquitos

    hernia

    peru

  1. Liberia’s Ebola Routine: Wear Your Temperature On Your Lapel
After 10 days in Liberia, NPR producer Nicole Beemsterboer has just landed in London. “You don’t realize how much has been hanging over your head until you’re out,” she says.
She’s talking about Ebola, the virus raging in Liberia as well as Sierra Leone and Guinea. “It was silent and invisible,” she says. “So you’re always on edge, always careful.”
How did you protect yourself?
I got used to not touching anyone, no handshakes. And there are buckets of chlorine solution everywhere — outside every office building, police station, government office, hotel, store. Everywhere. I washed my hands dozens of times a day, and was careful never to touch my face.
At government buildings, officials watch you wash your hands and then take your temperature with an ear-gun thermometer. They write your temperature on a piece of paper and actually staple it to your lapel so it’s visible to everyone inside. You can’t get in the building if you have a temperature, and it sends a message: We’re being vigilant; you need to be vigilant, too. Hold yourself and others accountable.
And you were careful right down to the soles of your boots?
We were concerned that if anything was contaminated, it was the bottom of our boots, so we were constantly rinsing them in the chlorine solution.
I don’t know that we started a trend, but on the last day we were there, our hotel added a shoe wash — a box with a big foam pad inside, soaked in chlorine so you didn’t have to soak your shoes but were getting enough chlorine on [the soles] to decontaminate them. We started seeing this more and more, at Redemption Hospital and other places around the city.
Does the chlorine cause any problems?
Only minor ones, and under the threat of Ebola, they didn’t bother me at all. All my clothes are spattered with bleach. I would dry my hands on my pants; my pants have bleach stains all over them. And it did smell like a pool everywhere you went.
Continue reading.
Photo: Body collectors come to the home of four children in Monrovia who lost both parents to Ebola. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR) View in High-Res

    Liberia’s Ebola Routine: Wear Your Temperature On Your Lapel

    After 10 days in Liberia, NPR producer Nicole Beemsterboer has just landed in London. “You don’t realize how much has been hanging over your head until you’re out,” she says.

    She’s talking about Ebola, the virus raging in Liberia as well as Sierra Leone and Guinea. “It was silent and invisible,” she says. “So you’re always on edge, always careful.”

    How did you protect yourself?

    I got used to not touching anyone, no handshakes. And there are buckets of chlorine solution everywhere — outside every office building, police station, government office, hotel, store. Everywhere. I washed my hands dozens of times a day, and was careful never to touch my face.

    At government buildings, officials watch you wash your hands and then take your temperature with an ear-gun thermometer. They write your temperature on a piece of paper and actually staple it to your lapel so it’s visible to everyone inside. You can’t get in the building if you have a temperature, and it sends a message: We’re being vigilant; you need to be vigilant, too. Hold yourself and others accountable.

    And you were careful right down to the soles of your boots?

    We were concerned that if anything was contaminated, it was the bottom of our boots, so we were constantly rinsing them in the chlorine solution.

    I don’t know that we started a trend, but on the last day we were there, our hotel added a shoe wash — a box with a big foam pad inside, soaked in chlorine so you didn’t have to soak your shoes but were getting enough chlorine on [the soles] to decontaminate them. We started seeing this more and more, at Redemption Hospital and other places around the city.

    Does the chlorine cause any problems?

    Only minor ones, and under the threat of Ebola, they didn’t bother me at all. All my clothes are spattered with bleach. I would dry my hands on my pants; my pants have bleach stains all over them. And it did smell like a pool everywhere you went.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Body collectors come to the home of four children in Monrovia who lost both parents to Ebola. (Tommy Trenchard for NPR)

  2. Global Health

    Ebola

    Liberia

    fever

    infectious disease

  1. Study: Kids In Orphanages Can Do As Well As Those In Foster Care
"Please, sir, I want some more," Oliver Twist famously asked in the food line at an orphanage.
Instead he got a blow to the head with a ladle.
In the real world, conditions at orphanages can be even bleaker. Back in the 1990s, media coverage of Romanian orphanages showed dozens of children sitting unclothed in crowded rooms. Most were neglected, and many were suffering from debilitating diseases like polio. Those with mental disabilities were confined to cribs or straitjackets.
So the call has always been to take the world’s estimated 2 million to 8 millionorphaned and abandoned children living in institutions, and place them with foster families.
A study out of Duke University offers a different perspective.
Some kids in institutions can do just as well as those in a foster home, says Kathryn Whetten, the study’s lead author and a population health researcher at Duke who focuses on children.
As you might expect, it’s an arguable conclusion.
The study, published this week in PLOS ONE, looked at kids ages 6 to 12 in five low- and middle-income countries: Cambodia, India, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania. The goal was to work with a culturally diverse sample.
For three years, researchers tracked the well-being of more than 1,300 children in orphanages, where care is provided by shift workers, and 1,400 who were cared for by a foster family. Every six months, they compared the physical and mental health of the subjects, along with their learning ability and memory.
If the policymakers’ assumptions were true, Whetten says, children in the institutions should have fared much worse than their counterparts in foster care.
That wasn’t what she found.
Continue reading.
Photo: A woman walks with children at an orphanage in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Policymakers have long called for orphans to be taken out of institutions and placed with foster families, but one study from Duke University is challenging that notion. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images) View in High-Res

    Study: Kids In Orphanages Can Do As Well As Those In Foster Care

    "Please, sir, I want some more," Oliver Twist famously asked in the food line at an orphanage.

    Instead he got a blow to the head with a ladle.

    In the real world, conditions at orphanages can be even bleaker. Back in the 1990s, media coverage of Romanian orphanages showed dozens of children sitting unclothed in crowded rooms. Most were neglected, and many were suffering from debilitating diseases like polio. Those with mental disabilities were confined to cribs or straitjackets.

    So the call has always been to take the world’s estimated 2 million to 8 millionorphaned and abandoned children living in institutions, and place them with foster families.

    A study out of Duke University offers a different perspective.

    Some kids in institutions can do just as well as those in a foster home, says Kathryn Whetten, the study’s lead author and a population health researcher at Duke who focuses on children.

    As you might expect, it’s an arguable conclusion.

    The study, published this week in PLOS ONE, looked at kids ages 6 to 12 in five low- and middle-income countries: Cambodia, India, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania. The goal was to work with a culturally diverse sample.

    For three years, researchers tracked the well-being of more than 1,300 children in orphanages, where care is provided by shift workers, and 1,400 who were cared for by a foster family. Every six months, they compared the physical and mental health of the subjects, along with their learning ability and memory.

    If the policymakers’ assumptions were true, Whetten says, children in the institutions should have fared much worse than their counterparts in foster care.

    That wasn’t what she found.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: A woman walks with children at an orphanage in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Policymakers have long called for orphans to be taken out of institutions and placed with foster families, but one study from Duke University is challenging that notion. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

  2. children's health

    global health

    orphanages

    romania

    foster care

    orphans

  1. Peter Piot and his colleagues were looking at samples from a Belgian nun who had died of a disease in Congo. The question he thought he was trying to answer: Was it yellow fever? 
Instead it was a new disease.
Read more and listen to the interview: The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This View in High-Res

    Peter Piot and his colleagues were looking at samples from a Belgian nun who had died of a disease in Congo. The question he thought he was trying to answer: Was it yellow fever? 

    Instead it was a new disease.

    Read more and listen to the interview: The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This

  2. Ebola

    global health

    infectious disease

    viruses

    HIV/AIDS

  1. A Peace Corps Stint In Madagascar Gave Him A Vision Of Vanilla
Madagascar-grown orchids produce most of the world’s vanilla beans, but vanilla extract isn’t manufactured in country. Former Peace Corps volunteers-turned-entrepreneurs Tim McCollum and Brett Beach, co-founders of the Brooklyn-basedMadécasse brand, aim to change that. They want to produce the world’s first “bean to bottle” extract, made entirely in Madagascar by local people using all-local materials — right down to the packaging. Although Madécasse is best known for its high-end, bean-to-bar chocolate from Madagascar, McCollum says the inspiration for his business came from vanilla.
You first went to Madagascar as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English. What was your experience like there?
I entered the Peace Corps as a 22-year-old wanting to contribute to something bigger. I wanted to do something good. It was 1999, and I didn’t know the first thing about the place. I was sent to a post in a remote northeast coast town. I spent two years there.
I lived in a vanilla-growing region of the country. The landscape was beautiful. Every farmer had a vanilla farm. I knew it was the vanilla capital of the world. The children of the farmers were my students. Everything there was subsistence, but vanilla was one of the few cash crops. They would just bundle it for export. Everyone knows the price, who has the good beans, who’s a diligent farmer.
I remember the chatter, hearing the word for vanilla, la vanille. They’d be speaking the Malagasy dialect and then I’d hear “la vanille.” I only knew that everyone was talking about vanilla. By the next season, I knew what they were talking about — whether it was a good or bad season, what they planned to do with the money they earned. I could tell it was very important to the community.
Read the rest of the interview.
Photo: The orchids that produce vanilla beans have no natural pollinators in Madagascar; the plant must be pollinated by hand — a labor-intensive process with little margin for error. (Courtesy of Madécasse) View in High-Res

    A Peace Corps Stint In Madagascar Gave Him A Vision Of Vanilla

    Madagascar-grown orchids produce most of the world’s vanilla beans, but vanilla extract isn’t manufactured in country. Former Peace Corps volunteers-turned-entrepreneurs Tim McCollum and Brett Beach, co-founders of the Brooklyn-basedMadécasse brand, aim to change that. They want to produce the world’s first “bean to bottle” extract, made entirely in Madagascar by local people using all-local materials — right down to the packaging. Although Madécasse is best known for its high-end, bean-to-bar chocolate from Madagascar, McCollum says the inspiration for his business came from vanilla.

    You first went to Madagascar as a Peace Corps volunteer teaching English. What was your experience like there?

    I entered the Peace Corps as a 22-year-old wanting to contribute to something bigger. I wanted to do something good. It was 1999, and I didn’t know the first thing about the place. I was sent to a post in a remote northeast coast town. I spent two years there.

    I lived in a vanilla-growing region of the country. The landscape was beautiful. Every farmer had a vanilla farm. I knew it was the vanilla capital of the world. The children of the farmers were my students. Everything there was subsistence, but vanilla was one of the few cash crops. They would just bundle it for export. Everyone knows the price, who has the good beans, who’s a diligent farmer.

    I remember the chatter, hearing the word for vanilla, la vanille. They’d be speaking the Malagasy dialect and then I’d hear “la vanille.” I only knew that everyone was talking about vanilla. By the next season, I knew what they were talking about — whether it was a good or bad season, what they planned to do with the money they earned. I could tell it was very important to the community.

    Read the rest of the interview.

    Photo: The orchids that produce vanilla beans have no natural pollinators in Madagascar; the plant must be pollinated by hand — a labor-intensive process with little margin for error. (Courtesy of Madécasse)

  2. Vanilla

    Peace Corps

    Madagascar

  1. How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus
Ebola has a nasty reputation for the way it damages the body. It’s rightfully earned.
"At the end stage of the disease, you have small leaks in blood vessels," says Thomas Geisbert, an immunologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. “You end up with essentially no blood pressure. Your body temperature drops and you go into shock.”
ut when you look at the nitty-gritty details of an Ebola infection, a surprising fact surfaces: The virus isn’t what ends up killing you. It’s your own immune system.
"The normal job of the immune system is to eliminate infections," says virologist Christopher Basler, at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “But when it’s activated at extreme levels or it’s out of control, it becomes damaging to the host.”
The most extreme immune attack is the “cytokine storm.” Although many viruses, like bird flu and SARS, can trigger this shock and awe assault, Ebola is probably the best at it. And at the end of an Ebola infection, it’s the cytokine storm that kills you, Basler says.
In essence, a cytokine storm is an SOS signal that causes the immune system to launch its entire arsenal of weapons all atonce. This last-ditch, kamikaze attack hurts the virus. But it leaves behind tons of collateral damage. Blood vessels take the brunt of it.
"The cytokine storm makes the blood vessel walls more permeable," Basler says. So the arteries, veins and capillaries start to leak blood and plasma.
Continue reading.
Artwork by Lisa Brown for NPR View in High-Res

    How Ebola Kills You: It’s Not The Virus

    Ebola has a nasty reputation for the way it damages the body. It’s rightfully earned.

    "At the end stage of the disease, you have small leaks in blood vessels," says Thomas Geisbert, an immunologist at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. “You end up with essentially no blood pressure. Your body temperature drops and you go into shock.”

    ut when you look at the nitty-gritty details of an Ebola infection, a surprising fact surfaces: The virus isn’t what ends up killing you. It’s your own immune system.

    "The normal job of the immune system is to eliminate infections," says virologist Christopher Basler, at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “But when it’s activated at extreme levels or it’s out of control, it becomes damaging to the host.”

    The most extreme immune attack is the “cytokine storm.” Although many viruses, like bird flu and SARS, can trigger this shock and awe assault, Ebola is probably the best at it. And at the end of an Ebola infection, it’s the cytokine storm that kills you, Basler says.

    In essence, a cytokine storm is an SOS signal that causes the immune system to launch its entire arsenal of weapons all atonce. This last-ditch, kamikaze attack hurts the virus. But it leaves behind tons of collateral damage. Blood vessels take the brunt of it.

    "The cytokine storm makes the blood vessel walls more permeable," Basler says. So the arteries, veins and capillaries start to leak blood and plasma.

    Continue reading.

    Artwork by Lisa Brown for NPR

  2. Global health

    Ebola

    West Africa

    Virology

    infectious disease

  1. Rice Bucket Challenge: Put Rice In Bucket, Do Not Pour Over Head
There’s the Ice Bucket Challenge. And now there’s the Rice Bucket Challenge.
More than a million people worldwide have poured buckets of ice water over their heads as part of a fund-raising campaign for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.
But when word of the challenge made its way to India, where more than 100 million people lack access to clean drinking water, locals weren’t exactly eager to drench themselves with the scarce supply.
And so, a spinoff was born.
Manju Kalanidhi, a 38-year-old journalist from Hyderabad who reports on the global rice market, put her own twist on the challenge. She calls her version the Rice Bucket Challenge, but don’t worry, no grains of rice went to waste.
Instead, they went to the hungry.
"I personally think the [Ice Bucket Challenge] is ideal for the American demographic," she says. "But in India, we have loads of other causes to promote."
Kalanidhi came up with a desi version — that’s a Hindi word to describe something Indian. She chose to focus on hunger. A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 USD a day, and a kilogram of rice, or 2 pounds, costs between 80 cents and a dollar. A family of four would go through roughly 45 pounds of rice a month, she says.
That’s why she’s challenging people to give a bucket of rice, cooked or uncooked, to a person in need. Snap a photo, share it online and, just as with the Ice Bucket Challenge, nominate friends to take part, she suggests. For those who want to help more than one person at a time, she recommends donating to a food charity.
Continue reading.
Photo: Rice is just as nice as ice when it comes to bucket challenges. Right: Manju Latha Kalanidhi, creator of the Rice Bucket Challenge, gives grains to a hard-working neighbor. (Courtesy of Manju Latha Kalanidhi) View in High-Res

    Rice Bucket Challenge: Put Rice In Bucket, Do Not Pour Over Head

    There’s the Ice Bucket Challenge. And now there’s the Rice Bucket Challenge.

    More than a million people worldwide have poured buckets of ice water over their heads as part of a fund-raising campaign for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

    But when word of the challenge made its way to India, where more than 100 million people lack access to clean drinking water, locals weren’t exactly eager to drench themselves with the scarce supply.

    And so, a spinoff was born.

    Manju Kalanidhi, a 38-year-old journalist from Hyderabad who reports on the global rice market, put her own twist on the challenge. She calls her version the Rice Bucket Challenge, but don’t worry, no grains of rice went to waste.

    Instead, they went to the hungry.

    "I personally think the [Ice Bucket Challenge] is ideal for the American demographic," she says. "But in India, we have loads of other causes to promote."

    Kalanidhi came up with a desi version — that’s a Hindi word to describe something Indian. She chose to focus on hunger. A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 USD a day, and a kilogram of rice, or 2 pounds, costs between 80 cents and a dollar. A family of four would go through roughly 45 pounds of rice a month, she says.

    That’s why she’s challenging people to give a bucket of rice, cooked or uncooked, to a person in need. Snap a photo, share it online and, just as with the Ice Bucket Challenge, nominate friends to take part, she suggests. For those who want to help more than one person at a time, she recommends donating to a food charity.

    Continue reading.

    Photo: Rice is just as nice as ice when it comes to bucket challenges. Right: Manju Latha Kalanidhi, creator of the Rice Bucket Challenge, gives grains to a hard-working neighbor. (Courtesy of Manju Latha Kalanidhi)

  2. Global health

    hunger

    ALS

    ice bucket challenge

    rice bucket challenge

  1. They Are The Body Collectors: A Perilous Job In The Time Of Ebola

    This powerful video taken by our NPR correspondents in Liberia will take you right to the scene as body collectors come to take away Rachel Wleh. In the space of a few days, her four children have lost both parents. One collector says, “My mom and dad don’t want me to do this job. But I feel I should do it to save my nation.”

    Read the story and listen to the audio.

  2. Global health

    Ebola

    Liberia

    burial

  1. In Haiti, An ‘American Idol’-Style Contest About Child Slavery
Haiti’s got talent.
Tamarre Joseph paces the stage, her sleek, short blue dress hugging her pencil-thin frame. She works the hometown crowd, rapping "Nap rive peyi san restavek."
The thousands in the packed stadium jump and sing along. An entire section of men take off their shirts and wave them overhead.
A rain cloud hangs ominously over the national soccer stadium in downtown Port-au-Prince, blocking the view of the mountains beyond. At one end of the stadium sits a stage with the words “Chante Pou Libete” above their English translation: “Songs for Freedom.”
"Nap rive peyi san restavek."
We will be a country without restaveks.
This concert, free to the public, was billed as a way to speak about the unspoken: Haiti’s deplorably large population of restaveks — child slaves.
It’s certainly unusual to have an American Idol-style competition for songs about slavery. And it’s definitely ironic that this event is taking place in the home of the world’s only successful slave revolt.
The 2013 Global Slavery Index ranks Haiti second in the world for modern slavery, with an estimated 200,000 to 220,000 slaves. Only Mauritania is worse. While that number includes adults, the vast majority are minors. Restavek roughly translates to “stay with” in Creole (“avec” is French for with). Often, families from the countryside send young children to live with wealthier families in Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital. In exchange for a promised better life and education, the child will contribute to household chores like cooking, washing clothes and fetching water.
In thousands of cases, children are forced into servitude: They take on most, if not all, of the household work, they’re beaten and sexually assaulted, they never get the education they hoped to earn.
Continue reading.
Photo :Frantzita Dede, who’s 19, sings “Let’s Help Them” — the child slaves of Haiti. View in High-Res

    In Haiti, An ‘American Idol’-Style Contest About Child Slavery

    Haiti’s got talent.

    Tamarre Joseph paces the stage, her sleek, short blue dress hugging her pencil-thin frame. She works the hometown crowd, rapping "Nap rive peyi san restavek."

    The thousands in the packed stadium jump and sing along. An entire section of men take off their shirts and wave them overhead.

    A rain cloud hangs ominously over the national soccer stadium in downtown Port-au-Prince, blocking the view of the mountains beyond. At one end of the stadium sits a stage with the words “Chante Pou Libete” above their English translation: “Songs for Freedom.”

    "Nap rive peyi san restavek."

    We will be a country without restaveks.

    This concert, free to the public, was billed as a way to speak about the unspoken: Haiti’s deplorably large population of restaveks — child slaves.

    It’s certainly unusual to have an American Idol-style competition for songs about slavery. And it’s definitely ironic that this event is taking place in the home of the world’s only successful slave revolt.

    The 2013 Global Slavery Index ranks Haiti second in the world for modern slavery, with an estimated 200,000 to 220,000 slaves. Only Mauritania is worse. While that number includes adults, the vast majority are minors. Restavek roughly translates to “stay with” in Creole (“avec” is French for with). Often, families from the countryside send young children to live with wealthier families in Port-au-Prince, Haiti’s capital. In exchange for a promised better life and education, the child will contribute to household chores like cooking, washing clothes and fetching water.

    In thousands of cases, children are forced into servitude: They take on most, if not all, of the household work, they’re beaten and sexually assaulted, they never get the education they hoped to earn.

    Continue reading.

    Photo :Frantzita Dede, who’s 19, sings “Let’s Help Them” — the child slaves of Haiti.

  2. Child slavery

    haiti

    American Idol

    restavek